U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Employment and Training Administration
Washington, D. C. 20210

CLASSIFICATION

JPTA

CORRESPONDENCE SYMBOL

TD

ISSUE DATE

April 9, 1998

RESCISSIONS

None

EXPIRATION DATE

Continuing

DIRECTIVE : TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION NOTICE NO. 33-97
 
TO : ALL STATE JTPA LIAISONS
ALL STATE WORKER ADJUSTMENT LIAISONS
ALL STATE EMPLOYMENT SECURITY AGENCIES
ALL ONE-STOP CAREER CENTER SYSTEM LEADS
 
FROM : DAVID HENSON
Director
Office of Regional Management
 
SUBJECT : Older Workers: Baby Boom Implications for Employment and Training Programs

 

  1. Purpose. To announce the publication and distribution of The Aging Baby Boom: Implications for Employment and Training Programs.

  2. Background. About 30 percent of the United States population was born between 1946 and 1964. Collectively, people in this age group are referred to as the Baby Boom generation. This genera- tion has had a profound effect on public policy and society as a whole. At each stage of the life cycle, this group has had an impact on public and private services. There is a need for workforce development practitioners to be prepared for the demographic and workforce shifts brought about by the gradual transition of the Baby Boom Generation into retirement. The aforementioned report examines this phenomenon. The report was made available through a separate mailing.

    Older Worker Bulletin No. 98-8, along with the report's executive summary are both attached to provide a description. Also attached, is a press release announcing the publication of the report.

  3. Implications. The report documents the aging of the eligible population of the workforce development programs, noting that the number of low-income mature workers will increase by 25 percent, from 8 to 10 million people, within the next several years. This is contrasted with the relatively low proportion of individuals ages 55 and better currently being served under Title II and III of the Job Training Partnership Act. Recruitment practices may need to be improved, and the design of service delivery may need to be modified, if the presently under-represented mature economically disadvantaged population is to be effectively served as the demographic bulge passes into the next century.

  4. Distribution. Copies of the report have been sent under separate cover to State JTPA Liaisons, State Worker Adjustment Liaisons, State Employment Security Agencies, One-stop Career Center System Leads, ETA Regional Offices and Senior Community Service Employment Program sponsors.

  5. Inquiries. Questions, comments, or requests for additional copies may be addressed to David Richardson, Division of Older Worker Programs, Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, Room N-4641, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20210; telephone (202) 219-5904.

  6. Attachments. 

    1. Older Worker Bulletin 98-8

    2. Executive Summary The Aging Baby Boom: Implications for Employment and Training Programs

    3. ETA Press Release: "Growing Population of Older Workers Will Face Challenges, According to Recent Labor Department/Urban Institute Report" [03/12/98]

  7. Separate Cover. The Aging Baby Boom: Implications for Employment and Training Programs

 

NOTE: Attachments "b", "c", and "The Aging Baby Boom:..." not available to DMS